Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

Jenny Brotherton, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






One of the plays currently running at the Moxie Theatre in San Diego is “Bliss (Or Emily Post is Dead!)” The show was written by Jami Brandi, a female playwright, and is being produced in a joint world premiere with Promethean Theatre, and Moving Arts.

The story is based on characters from Greek mythology while providing them with a new setting and varying circumstances. These Greek heroines are now set in North Orange, New Jersey in the 1960’s.

Clementine (Clytemenstra), (Morgan Carberry) is a witty housewife who questions the social expectations of women. She develops a relationship with Doctor Smith (Steve Froehlich) who prescribes her anti-anxiety pills that she shares between herself and her friend Maddy (Medea), (Lydia Lea Real). Maddy is a peppy and obedient housewife who follows the rules of social etiquette encouraged by Emily Post and society as a whole, yet isn’t quite accepted by her neighbors. She teaches Antonia (Antigone), (Taylor Linekin), the endearing and curious teenager next door, in the ways of etiquette and mannerisms. Antonia meets Cassandra (Alexandra Slade) who is a captivating and intelligent typist visiting New Orange. She explains these visions of death and destruction she sees and warns them of their possible fate.

Taylor Linekin, a senior at San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts, describes her experience with portraying Antonia, “My favorite part about playing Antonia was the ability it gave me to go on the journey of empowerment. The shifts she experiences throughout the show from beginning to end allows for her character development to turn her into somewhat of an activist by the end. Though she begins as an abused highschooler, she ends the play as a fearless woman capable of breaking her own cycle.”

Taylor Linekin is the youngest actress in the show since the rest of the characters are adults. Although she is acting with an all adult cast, her professionalism and natural stage presence are remarkable and admirable to viewers of all ages.

Taylor Linekin explains what she has learned from this experience so far, “The most important thing this show has taught me is how to work alongside professional adults. In the past, I’ve only ever had the chance to create art with my peers, or other students my age, but through being a part of Bliss, I’ve gotten the opportunity to learn how to work with actors much more experienced than I. This has resulted in me getting to learn more about the entertainment business, while also making connections that will hopefully help my career in the future.”

This inspiring show shares the timeless lessons of Greek tragedies and incorporates them into a unique and innovative new story. The performances are mesmerizing and will engross you into the lives of the characters. “Bliss (Or Emily Post is Dead!)” is definitely a must see production!

Tickets, showtimes/dates, and more information about the production are on their website. 

 

 

Photos by Karli Cadel

 

 

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    Beyoncé Invests in College Students

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    Review: On My Block

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    Everything Sucks!

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    Love, Simon

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    The Shape of Water is a Must-See

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    2018 Superbowl Commercials

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    Lady Doritos Feed Stereotypes

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    “Snapchange” Disappoints

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    The Obama’s Presidential Portraits Make History

  • Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)

    A&E

    The Royal Engagement

Review: Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)